Blockchain & Cryptocurrency , Cryptocurrency Fraud , Fraud Management & Cybercrime

Cryptohack Roundup: Crypto Exchange Seizures

Also: Cost of Hacked Crypto Accounts, Level Finance Hack
Cryptohack Roundup: Crypto Exchange Seizures
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Every week, Information Security Media Group rounds up cybersecurity incidents in the world of digital assets. In the days between April 28 and May 4, the FBI and Ukrainian police seized nine virtual currency exchanges that serviced cybercriminals, Privacy Affairs noted the cost of hacked crypto accounts on darknet markets, and Level Finance suffered a $1 million hack.

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9 Virtual Currency Exchanges Seized

The FBI on Monday seized nine virtual currency exchange services allegedly used by ransomware hackers and other cybercriminals to launder illicit proceeds. The FBI's Detroit Field Office partnered with the Ukraine police to seize virtual currency exchanges that allowed criminals to transact anonymously, the U.S. Department of Justice said. The domains include 24xbtc.com, 100btc.pro, pridechange.com, 101crypta.com, uxbtc.com, trust-exchange.org, bitcoin24.exchange, paybtc.pro and owl.gold. The platforms were advertised on closed hacker forums.

Hacked, Verified Crypto Accounts Sold for a Few Hundred Dollars

Anyone can buy a verified cryptocurrency account in Kraken, Coinbase or LocalBitcoins for $810, $610 and $350, respectively, Privacy Affairs noted in a Monday statement, citing its latest Dark Web Price Index report. A full range of documents and account details allowing identity theft can be bought for $1,010. Online banking logins cost $100, and credit card details - including card number, associated dates and CVV - cost between $10 and $100.

Level Finance

A hacker stole crypto tokens worth $1 million from exchange Level Finance by exploiting a vulnerable smart contract, the company tweeted on Tuesday. Blockchain security firm PeckShield said the bug allowed the bad actor to make repeated referral claims for funds that were meant to only be claimed once. The company said at the time that it would deploy a fix within 12 hours of the hack.

With reporting from Information Security Media Group's Mihir Bagwe in Mumbai.


About the Author

Rashmi Ramesh

Rashmi Ramesh

Assistant Editor, Global News Desk, ISMG

Ramesh has seven years of experience writing and editing stories on finance, enterprise and consumer technology, and diversity and inclusion. She has previously worked at formerly News Corp-owned TechCircle, business daily The Economic Times and The New Indian Express.




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